Flowers that Don’t Attract Bees – Know What to Plant in the Garden

Having bright and colorful flowers is always a delight for many gardening enthusiasts. Nothing beats the joy of seeing them in full bloom, which is also reflective of the efforts that you have exerted to make sure that they grow in a manner that is healthy. It is inevitable, however, that there will be a point where it can also be a problem. One of the perfect examples of the latter will be when they start attracting bees.

We all know the importance of bees in pollination. However, in some cases, they can be a nuisance in the garden, especially when they start appearing like ruthless invaders. They can also be bad if there are people in the household who have allergies with bees. Bee stings are most likely to happen.

For some people, once they are confronted with bee infestation, the first thing that they do is to spray pesticides. While this can tackle the problem, this is not a long-term solution. Aside from the potential dangers to the environment, they can also be harmful for the plants. With this, a better solution is to know the flowers that you should have in the garden. You should specifically plant those that will be mentioned in the rest of this post.

Top 8 Flowers that Don’t Attach Bees

Foxglove

It comes with a long and throated bloom, which will most probably be dreaded by bees. Their long throat makes them difficult to be reached by bees, although hummingbirds will most likely suck on their nectar. If you are planting this beautiful flower in the garden, take note that they need to have generous amount of water. Also, they should never be reached by direct heat of the sun.

Foxglove

Fuchsia

If you want to prevent the bees from hovering around the plant, it is important to make sure that they are either positioned too high or they are tall. In the case of fuchsia, one of the best things is that they are often hang over baskets that are suspended high. Because of its location, it will be difficult for bees to collect its nectar.

Fuchsia

Roses

This is one thing that many of you may find surprising. Especially in the case of red roses, you won’t see bees swarming around. This is basically because red, similar to other bright colors, is one thing that bees hate the most. If you are interested in growing roses in the garden, it is best to make sure that the climate is cold enough.

Roses

Chrysanthemums

One of the reasons why this is not going to attract bees is because of the presence of double corolla. Also, many of its varieties are available in bright colors, such as red, yellow, pink, and orange, which is exactly why they are not as friendly to bees as other flowers in the garden. If you are growing this flower, however, make sure that the temperature is right. Avoid it when there is frost as it will most likely just end up dying.

Chrysanthemums

Carnations

Believed to have been around since the ancient times, this is another excellent flower to have in the garden if you hate bees. Rather than bees, their pollination usually happens through butterflies and other common insects. If you want to plant carnations at home, the best time to do it would be late fall or during the early winter months.

Carnations

Marigolds

This flower comes with low pollen count, which is already a good reason to believe that it indeed won’t attract bees in the garden. Also, because many of them are double flowers, it will be hard for bees to acquire their nectar. The best thing about marigolds that make them throw away bees is the pungent odor that they emit. It may not be too strong for humans, but it is heavily dreaded by bees.

Marigolds

Red Dianthus

Also called Sweet Williams, this is another flower that you should have in the garden if bees are starting to be a serious problem. Their red color is one of the features that make it shoo away bees. Also, it produces minimal pollen. Hence, there is no reason for bees to end up feasting on their flowers.

Red Dianthus

Strawflower

If you are looking for flowers that can effectively and naturally deter bees, this is another option you might want to consider. It is from the family of everlasting, which is why you can expect that it will be present in the garden throughout the year.

Strawflower

Conclusion

If you hate bees in the garden, now is the right time to take action. The problem is probably with the flowers that you have planted. Go back to the flowers that we have identified above and start growing them. Once they start to bloom you will also easily notice that your yard is finally free from be infestation.

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